A Desert Rat's Guide to Surviving & thriving in Chico, CA.

Bowling … Meetup.com & Couchsurfers rocking it.

Chico, CA - 10/23/2013 @ AMF Orchard Lanes.

“Everyone’s just looking for reasons to wake up and get out of bed, some do it for nothing but a kiss, perhaps a cup of coffee, others have a harder time; no train to catch, no hand to hold, no reasons at all.”

Unknown  (via gofuckingnuts)

This is so heartbreaking. 

(via avenuemariaclare)

(Source: quotethat, via catnipcharge)

Grooving on this wicked smart minimalist room - moveable walls, hammocks, etc..

alivesoul:

Priced Out: Lenox Lounge
By now, everyone knows Lenox Lounge is closing;  another victim in the continued gentrification of Harlem. I’ve actually been expecting this to happen for some time.  The rumors of its closing had been circulating since St. Nick’s Pub shut down last year. The owner says the landlord doubled the rent from 10k to 20k leaving him no choice but to shut down. 
Fitting.
I could echo the sentiments of many and say “what a shame” it is and move on.  I mean, after all, it’s old jazz club whose time has come and gone.   But as a person born in Harlem it is more than that.  It is another example of how the neighborhood I grew up in is being washed away and rebranded to suit the needs of gentrifiers also known in Harlem as “white folks”.  In my opinion, the bar should have long been designated a landmark like Minton’s Playhouse, given the depth of its history in the world of music and in the city of New York.  Sadly, that will not happen.   
When I lived in Harlem as an adult, I did the live jazz scene heavy.  On any given Friday night I’d go to Lenox Lounge, 449 LA, Shrine then up to St. Nick’s Pub to finish the night off.  Unfortunately, that will never happen again and I no longer live in Harlem.  Like the Lenox Lounge, I too was priced out.   Nope.  I cannot afford to live in a neighborhood that I once felt like I “owned”.  As a child, I went to PS 200 on a 150th and 7th, played “skellies” on every block from 144th to 153rd, kissed my first girl in the courtyard of Dunbar houses, played in the “mountains” of Bradhurst Park, first heard Hip Hop at the “Roof Top” Skating Rink.   
I loved that Harlem. 
I don’t recognize this one and that is not by accident. 
It reminds me of the neighborhood of Georgetown in Washington, DC which used to have a large African American population.  Our history in the neighborhood was once rich and deep.  You would never know that if you went to Georgetown today.  All that remains of that history is Mount Zion Union Methodist Church.  I suppose all that will be left of our history in Harlem will be the Apollo.   I mean Justin Beiber has to perform somewhere, right?
So when people talk to me about how much better Harlem is today than it was, my immediate answer is always the same…better for who? 
Better for who?

alivesoul:

Priced Out: Lenox Lounge

By now, everyone knows Lenox Lounge is closing;  another victim in the continued gentrification of Harlem. I’ve actually been expecting this to happen for some time.  The rumors of its closing had been circulating since St. Nick’s Pub shut down last year. The owner says the landlord doubled the rent from 10k to 20k leaving him no choice but to shut down. 

Fitting.

I could echo the sentiments of many and say “what a shame” it is and move on.  I mean, after all, it’s old jazz club whose time has come and gone.   But as a person born in Harlem it is more than that.  It is another example of how the neighborhood I grew up in is being washed away and rebranded to suit the needs of gentrifiers also known in Harlem as “white folks”.  In my opinion, the bar should have long been designated a landmark like Minton’s Playhouse, given the depth of its history in the world of music and in the city of New York.  Sadly, that will not happen.   

When I lived in Harlem as an adult, I did the live jazz scene heavy.  On any given Friday night I’d go to Lenox Lounge, 449 LA, Shrine then up to St. Nick’s Pub to finish the night off.  Unfortunately, that will never happen again and I no longer live in Harlem.  Like the Lenox Lounge, I too was priced out.   Nope.  I cannot afford to live in a neighborhood that I once felt like I “owned”.  As a child, I went to PS 200 on a 150th and 7th, played “skellies” on every block from 144th to 153rd, kissed my first girl in the courtyard of Dunbar houses, played in the “mountains” of Bradhurst Park, first heard Hip Hop at the “Roof Top” Skating Rink.   

I loved that Harlem. 

I don’t recognize this one and that is not by accident. 

It reminds me of the neighborhood of Georgetown in Washington, DC which used to have a large African American population.  Our history in the neighborhood was once rich and deep.  You would never know that if you went to Georgetown today.  All that remains of that history is Mount Zion Union Methodist Church.  I suppose all that will be left of our history in Harlem will be the Apollo.   I mean Justin Beiber has to perform somewhere, right?

So when people talk to me about how much better Harlem is today than it was, my immediate answer is always the same…better for who? 

Better for who?

(via randomberlinchick)

“Twitter feels like continually moving to NYC without knowing anyone whereas Facebook feels like you’re living in your hometown and hanging with everyone you went to high school with. Twitter’s we’re-all-here-in-the-moment thing… is what makes it possible for people to continually reinvent themselves on Twitter. You don’t have any of that Facebook baggage, the peer pressure from a lifetime of friends, holding you back. You are who your last dozen tweets say you are.”

thisisnotaboutlego:

Bamboo Courtyard Teahouse, Yangzhou, China

(HWCD Architects, 2012)

  • the Bamboo Courtyard Teahouse is a very simple structure, straight lines vertical and horizontal, the constant rhythm in the bamboo providing us the tranquility we seek in a teahouse
  • Bamboo provides shade and privacy while still allowing ventilation
  • Even indoors, the architects have managed to include bamboo structures without distracting people from the tea
  • A few trees add to the harmony of architecture and nature
  • Drinking tea is supposed to be calming, and drinking tea beside a still water pond among bamboo in a quiet location far from other buildings and bustle must be even more calming

Image source

Search
Navigate
Archive

Text, photographs, quotes, links, conversations, audio and visual material preserved for future reference.

Likes

A handpicked medley of inspirations, musings, obsessions and things of general interest.